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The Three Musicteers

Bush / Chevelle / Filter
House of Blues
Orlando, FL
October 19, 2011
Filter
Filter
Bush
Bush
Chevelle
Chevelle

Story by Brittany Fornof
Phoots by Nick Masuda

Lucky for Orlando, Filter didn't get the memo that opening acts are supposed to warm up the show not steal the spotlight. With blue and red lights flashing in the background, lead singer Richard Patrick shouted, "Put your hands up Orlando!" as he stepped off the stage and on to a stack of equipment cases at the front of the crowd.

Performing "Welcome to the Fold," shirtless Phil Buckman violently plucked away at the strings of his bass while guitarist John Radtke cradled the neck of his guitar. Stepping down from the top of the cases and walking towards the crowd, Patrick sang, "You take my money/You think you're great/You think it's funny/I hate your face." Patrick stretched himself across the length of the fence, practically lying in the crowd as he continued singing. Then, Patrick grabbed the camera of a photographer standing next to him and began snapping photos of himself with the audience.

Throughout their set, band played some of their more popular songs, including: "The Best Things" and "Hey Man, Nice Shot" as well as a cover of "Gimme All Your Lovin."

Kicking his leg towards the audience, Patrick straddled the pile of boxes at the foot of the stage and the fence.

"We don't like anything to come between us and the fans," announced Patrick. "You guys pay the bills and we know it." The audience cheered Bush in response. "Put your hands up one more time," shouted Patrick. "I want to see some rock and roll." With that, the audience obeyed his command and thrust their "rock on" signs towards the stage in rhythm with the beat.

"This next song is about dreams…about waking up and realizing you're not in your own bed, but realizing you're on an airplane," explained Patrick. "Realizing you are naked, but this is just my interpretation. It's not a reality." Trading their fast-paced rhythm for a more mellow sound, the band performed "Take My Picture." Mika Fineo slammed his drumsticks down on the cymbals during the drum-heavy song. "It just got a little too serious for me just now," commented Patrick as he jumped down off the stage and hopped onto the fence. "Hey I want to crowd surf! I'll be in your hands so don't drop me and break my neck."

"Give me some loving!" Patrick said, jumping into the crowd. Buckman furiously punched his bass strings as the song began. Singing the lyrics to "The Best Things," Patrick was carried through the crowd with his microphone in hand—swimming through the sea of hands—before being brought back to the front of the stage. With green lights flashing around him, Radtke hunched over his guitar and wagged his head like a dog, ripping a fantastic guitar solo.

The next act of the night proved to be just as entertaining as the first. With phenomenal musical talent, the members of Chevelle took the stage. Lead singer Pete Loeffler shouted, "Holy sh*t Orlando, its' good to see you guys again!" Playing an extensive, hour-long set, Chevelle performed many fan-favorite songs, including: "Saturate" and "Send the Pain Below." "Here's an oldie but a goodie," said Loeffler before breaking into the lyrics of "I Get It."

With a strong beat and melody as the backbone of every song, the band distinguishes itself as not just an average, but a great, band by their ability to perform live in front of an audience. Chevelle invests the same energy and into the first song as the last song, producing a quality performance. "We just feel amazing tonight," said Loeffler smiling. With a great range, Loeffler has the amazing capability of continuously alternating between screaming on pitch and singing in a clear voice throughout the course of the song. "Did that feel good people?" asked Loeffler. "I want to meet everyone tonight. I want to hang out with all of you. Is that possible?" The band closed out their set with hits "Get Some" and "Face to the Floor."

The much-anticipated performance of the night did not disappoint. Starting their set with "Machinehead," Bush rocked the house at the House of Blues in Orlando.

The band's appearance was as unique as their sound was original. Walking onto the stage dressed in a variety of blacks and grays, including leather jackets, ripped tees, laced boots and faded gray denim, the band looked like a group melancholy hipster rockstars. However, their performance was anything but glum.

Performing hits such as "All My Life" and "Greedy Fly," the band's set more than satisfied their eager audience. The energy that the band exchanged on stage among themselves poured into the audience. Whether he was bouncing on the balls of his feet at the foot of the microphone or jumping at the center of the stage with the guitar at his waste, Bush's frontman Gavin Rossdale never stood still. Lunging in front of the microphone with his guitar resting on his thigh, Rossdale closed his eyes and sang into the microphone.

Chris Traynor, with his long brunette hair and mischievous mustache, casually wrapped his fingers around the neck of his guitar and made short, quick strokes across the strings. With a serene look on his face, Traynor strummed away, immersed in the music he was producing. Playing "Everything Zen," Rossdale knelt at the front of the stage in true rock-and-roll style with an across-the-scale guitar solo as the crowd began chanting, "There's no sex in your violence."

The popularity of the band can be attributed to not just their ability to record award-winning songs, but in giving their concert fans an experience. Singing straight from his soul and straight to the heart of the audience, Rossdale looked out into the audience and made eye contact with fans in the crowd. The band's performance topped off what was already an incredible night for rock music.

Throughout the set, Rossdale transformed his image repeatedly with the altering of small details. The band also did a few transformations. For "All Night Doctors," the band opted for a softer sound. Corey Britz swapped his bass for a keyboard while percussionist Robin Goodridge tapped out the slower rhytm for the song.

Looking around the room, one could see the security guards tapping their feet to the beat, fans of all backgrounds cheering from the balcony, and audience members perched at the foot of the stage waving their arms in sync with the music. The House of Blues was built for a night like that.

Related articles:

Institute (Gavin Rossdale) - Concert review - Milwaukee, WI - November 2005
Bush - Concert review - Milwaukee, WI - March 2002
Chevelle (Summerfest 2009) - Concert review - Milwaukee, WI - July 2009
Chevelle / Helmet / Crossfade (Winterfresh Snocore Tour) - Concert review - Milwaukee, WI - February 2005
Chevelle - Vena Sera - Album review
Chevelle (Ozzfest 2003) - Concert review - East Troy, WI - August 2003
Filter (Family Values Tour 2001 Tour) - Concert review - Rosemont, IL - October 2001
Filter - Anthems For The Damned - Album review

Filter
Filter
Bush
Bush
Bush
Bush
Bush
Bush
Filter
Filter
Bush
Bush
Filter
Filter
Chevelle
Chevelle
Bush
Bush
Bush
Bush
Chevelle
Chevelle
Filter
Filter
Bush
Bush
Bush
Bush
Chevelle
Chevelle
Filter
Filter
Bush
Bush
Filter
Filter
Bush
Bush
Chevelle
Chevelle
Chevelle
Chevelle

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